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icon smDuring the early 19th century the whalebone, reed and metal that are familar to us were set aside in favour of simple cording.

icon smIn the final installment, Lucy constructs the Louis XV corset from the pattern she showed us how to draft previously.

icon smOur very first corset pattern with all horizontal seams. "Especially suitable for tightlacing" - what do you think? Will it work?

icon smAltering a premade Edwardian pattern is difficult, so the ability to draft one from scratch saves a big headache! Part three...

icon free smThis corset uses machine corded fabric instead of bones to stiffen the panels into an impressively curvaceous shape. Here's how to make a corded corset yourself.

icon smDrafting the front of a beautiful S-bend corset pattern from the Edwardian era, called "Louis XV corset in nine pieces".

icon free smSandra explores a high-panel C19th corset with multiple vertical seams, giving corsetmakers plenty of areas to make adjustments.

icon smDrafting the back of a beautiful S-bend corset pattern from the Edwardian era, called "Louis XV corset in nine pieces".

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Joanne shows how to use old patterns to make beautiful garments that are just not possible with today's mass market sewing patterns.

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