SIGN UP
Log in
HomeArticlesBusinessDesignDrawing Flats for Corsetieres: 2

Drawing Flats for Corsetieres: 2

Advanced FlatsMore on technical fashion drawings known as "flats". You'll learn how to take your corset illustrations to the next level, with Marianne's three keys to beautiful flats.

Register to read more...
Gravatar
juliab  
  Wow. I'm pretty good at Illustrator and flats, but this article is BRILLIANT - stuff I didn't know would have taken me ages to research. Thankyou !  
 
marianne  
  Thank you, Julia!  
 
Gravatar
beespoke  
  Thank you, Marianne. I think I'm ready to move on to part two of your tutorial. I have two questions that I'm sure you can answer! In creating your busks, do you save those to a different file, calling it busks as an ai file or jpg and then call it up and copy and paste into your new document every tme you need it for a new flat to save time? Also, when making grommets, can you do the same thing? And if so, how do you shorten the grommets for the back panel without changing the spacing? I can't wait to get to the point that I can make flats as quickly and perfect as yours. Hopefully, you can make part 3 of the tutorial, including flossing and ruffles. Again, thank you so much for being so in depth with this. It truly helps!!!  
 
marianne  
  Hi Jill,
The busks and grommet strip are all in the same file, just on a separate layer. Look at the images at the beginning of the "Back View" section to see the layers palette. I design essentially ALL of my flats stacked in one massive file so I can pull things from previous layers (seamlines, hemlines, smaller details). If that's too cumbersome, you can also create a new document and copy and paste in front your base pieces (the croquis, grommets, busk, whatever else you are highly likely to need) so that the point of reference for pasting details stays constant.
You shorten the grommet strip just by deleting the extra grommet-circles, because they are each their own separate object. Then select the remaining grommets and nudge them up or down until they are spaced appropriately for the top and bottom edge of your design.
 
 
marianne  
  Ran out of space!
At this point, there are no plans for a part 3. Parts 1&2 cover the essentials, but the list of details such as ruffles and flossing is potentially infinite. (Especially since flossing, for example, has infinite variation.) Some won't render well in the small-scale that your flats will be viewed. I would try for flossing just using the pen or line tool with a very fine point line if you really need to. I had one client communicate flossing placement with me by circling the ends of the bone channel on the base flat, and we emailed inspiration photos and sketches to settle on the design for the flossing.

If I get more clear requests for another installment with specific details, I will create one.

But for now I've got plenty of different article ideas on the publication calendar... I'd also love to make one that focuses on hand-illustration, rather than stoic flats, but that's another where I need to assess the community needs before writing the piece. :)
 
 
Gravatar
beespoke  
  Marianne,
Thank you so much for answering my questions. I'm definitely getting better at this and practice every few days. I LOVE it! This is an exceptional article and will make it so much easier for clients to mix tops and bottoms, etc. (Much easier for me!) I probably will continue to hand sketch designs/ideas for myself, but will use these AI flats for client choices. Also, rather than adding flossing, lace, etc to the computer generated flats, I'm thinking that I could add those tiny details by hand as each will vary so much. Again, thank you!
 
 
Gravatar
marianne  
  I think hand drawing on printed flats is a fine idea for conveying final touches. Easier to make adjustments on-the-fly as you do in-person consults, as well. (By the way, don't forget you can apply a lace overlay as a pattern fill. As a trim it's probably easier to hand-sketch, though.)  
 
Hide comment form

1000 Characters left


FacebookTwitterGoogle Bookmarks Pin It

Save

Save