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Corset Pattern Scaling

Scaling the PatternSandra Stuart walks you through enlarging a small diagram to the correct size for the creation of a working pattern, using an 1878 original and Photoshop.

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clockwork_faerie  
  wonderful, thanks so much! I'd been running into problems with the printing step, but cutting out 8.5x11 pieces yourself and then printing each one definitely makes sense. Cheers!  
 
juliab  
  I had to cut my original comment as it was too long. Basically, there is an easier way to make a grid on p/shop. You open a new document the exact size of the squares you wish your grid to have. You then outline this little square document with the stroke function. Then you use that document to "define pattern". Name the new pattern 1" grid or whatever is appropriate (I have several size of grid in my pattern menu now). Open your new 'working' document, add a fill layer with your grid pattern - you now have the correct sized grid grid in it's own separate layer.. Then in another layer on top of the pattern fill layer, you can 'place' your scanned (or otherwise) pattern. In order to have the pattern over the grid, with no white bits apparent, all you do is then 'multiply' the corset pattern layer and this will then sit very nicely with no interference on your grid. You can then start work on scaling as per this tutorial.  
 
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s_stuart  
  juliab: I tried out your gridding method, and it worked great - thanks for sharing it! (One of the great things about Photoshop: there's usually more than one way to do something.) Use Julia's method for an opaque grid. For a lines-only transparent grid, like the one I used in the tutorial, I created a new layer in my 1"x1" file, applied the stroke function to this, then deleted the opaque background layer before defining the file as a pattern.  
 
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bestinterests  
  Thank you for responding to my questions about using this software! Julia B, could you share more details? Using software that I had resigned:-D to "work" not fun, is fabulous!  
 
marianne  
  I'd love to try this using Illustrator - seems like that'd be a simple and clean way to make the probably-necessary pattern adjustments.

Also, for those of us in the States, FedEx actually does large scale black and white prints for quite cheap now - I had an 8.5x11 PDF blown up to 18x24 for less than $3.
 
 
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s_stuart  
  marianne: Anyone familiar with Adobe Illustrator should definitely give it a go! Most of the methods described for Photoshop scaling will work just as well in Illustrator, and there's the added bonus of being able to manipulate the pattern's lines digitally after the main pattern has been scaled up. (I used the Photoshop-with-pencil-adjustments approach in this article, because that's what I'm most comfortable with, but a short Illustrator test-run proved that my preferred way isn't the only way!)  
 
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galadriel  
  Will this work if I scan one of the patterns from, for example, Corsets and Crinolines, or Waisted Efforts?
I am really bad with this sort of thing haha
 
 
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galadriel  
  OK... figured out that it will do... Next question..
What if my proportions are significanty different to those of the original corset (My measures are 34-22-34, Im a B cup, so not all gored corsets will fit my bust if I scale them to my hips, for example)
Will I only be able to scale the pattern to one particular measure, such as my high hip measure, and then have to alter the pattern after I've sewn my toile?
 
 
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s_stuart  
  galadriel: (As you've discovered, this works great for enlarging the tiny patterns found in books!) Whether historical or contemporary, almost no pattern for a close-fitting garment is going to be an exact match for the eventual wearer's proportions - such is the way of fashion! I do believe that making an initial toile - scaled to fit at least one of your measurements perfectly - will provide the most accurate information about how to alter the other areas of the pattern. Making a first and then a second toile might seem like a lot of extra work, but a good fit is worth the effort. (My previous article showed that the first toile only fit at the high hips and bust, but I had to make vertical and horizontal adjustments elsewhere.)  
 
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rofava  
  I am adoring this subject. In spite of using Mac I did not manage to use satisfactorily the Photoshop, used the outdated Corel Draw again.
But my doubt is regarding finding the points of the waist, since this pattern has the practically straight modeling., but even so I managed to re-scale the pattern.
Tk. for step by step.
 
 
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tia_helena  
  Very nice tutorial, especially since you used Photoshop, which is not really designed for this type of work, try using Adobe Illustrator, Inkscape (free) or Corel. These are designed for drawing and you can trace your pattern and modify it on the fly. Also Illustrator tiles nicely into pdf for selling and printing.  
 
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roseyposey  
  This is one of the most clearly written, easy to follow tutorials I have ever read. Thank you!  
 
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