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Corseting Various Body Types

icon-smMarianne discusses different body types and how to go about creating custom corsets to fit these various forms, from a business perspective.

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Wendy Jay  
  Please add me to your subscription. thanks!  
 
pollyanna  
  Hi there Wendy,
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Please drop me a line at info@harmanhay.com if you have any questions, want to apply for discount membership, or have any trouble going through the signup process - I'll be only too happy to assist.
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crumder  
  I'm troubled by your dismissal of lower back curve as "self-diagnosed sway-back, which is really just their bad posture". I beg your pardon?

A pronounced lower back curve is a thing that people have in varying degrees, and this is an anatomical feature affected only slightly by posture. A structured garment that doesn't take this into account is a less comfortable, less flattering garment--goodness knows I've had enough things that pinched at my kidneys or pooled in the center of my back, and these things were WORSE when I stood perfectly straight with my shoulders back. Ignoring that fitting issue and calling it a fault of the wearer is an awfully shoddy viewpoint for someone advocating a comfortable and accommodating fit for a variety of bodies, no?
 
 
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marianne  
  I'm sorry that my throwaway remark gave offense. What I meant was that, as one has to go out of one's way to learn about proper posture, it is as easy to self-diagnose a swayback as it is with an alleged gluten intolerance, which can also be a serious medical concern, despite the rash of trend (rather than medically) based gluten-free diets. To stand and walk with the pelvis aligned instead of tipped back requires a concerted effort for many, if not most, women, but in most cases it's an issue of body awareness. If you read beyond that sentence, you saw that I addressed that particular fit issue a couple paragraphs later, advising that attention be paid to the front/back distribution of the hip spring as well as its shape. As with the full bust concerns, there is now a separate article specifically devoted to swayback shaping - the purpose of this piece was to give an overview rather than address each figure type in-depth.  
 
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crumder  
  I'm troubled by your dismissal of lower back curve as "self-diagnosed sway-back, which is really just their bad posture". I beg your pardon?

A pronounced lower back curve is a thing that people have in varying degrees, and this is an anatomical feature affected only slightly by posture. A structured garment that doesn't take this into account is a less comfortable, less flattering garment--goodness knows I've had enough things that pinched at my kidneys or pooled in the small of my back, and these things were WORSE when I stood perfectly straight with my shoulders back. Ignoring that fitting issue and calling it a fault of the wearer is an awfully shoddy viewpoint for someone advocating a comfortable and accommodating fit for a variety of bodies, no?
 
 
stitchlord  
  I have a question about the small-bust corsetting!

I haven't made a successful corset yet because fitting small bust hasn't been addressed in any detail. When you say 'cutlets can be added', can you be more specific? I tried this, and instead of boosting, they pushed the cups away from my body. Do I pattern for the bust measurement I want and then add cutlets?
 
 
marianne  
  The first thing you want to do is play with the position of the cutlets. I place them at the bottom of the bust and towards the outside of the breast - think 5:00 and 7:00 if you were looking at a clock face. I generally don't stitch them in, but slide them in and finesse the position once the corset is on. If the underbust isn't snug enough then of course the cutlets can't push up the bust.

As far as measurements, I would use your natural measurements. You could also try measuring your bust in a thin bra + cutlets.

Try blending from the underbust to apex with a curve that is somewhat concave at the bottom for push up effect. Take volume out from the side bust, or by angling the bust seam back (towards the underarm) rather than flattening out the curve over the bustline itself.

Hope that helps! Good luck!
 
 
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